11kV Overheads and Water Spray.

You a are farmer. You have potato fields that need watering due to the lack of rain and the hot weather. You tow your water sprayer trailer out to the potato field and connect up the pipes. The water can be mains or deep bore hole sourced. The spray is very high pressure and reaches a great height. In fact it reached the 11kV overhead cables that run across your field.

Is there any danger?

Here is a static system, but yours is mobile on a tyred trailer. It does though show the height of the sprays.

Large Lawn Field Irrigation System - Bing video

Parents
  • More on water.

    In the table  below "442 solution" contain the following salts diluted in pure water: 40% sodium bicarbonate, 40% sodium sulphate and 20% sodium chloride. These represent the main conductive ions that are in typical surface and ground water. A purely sodium chloride solution is probably more representative of brackish or sea water.

    Converting to a single % 'TDS' total dissolved solids from measuring conductivity is a bit of a con, as the different ions do not have quite the same mobility in a given electric field, but close enough for some generalizations to within a factor of 2. That may sound terrible, but as the salt concentration varies by factors of ten and is about as uniform as wind-speed in places where water flows and mixes, it is often good enough.

    (1uS/cm is 1 megohm.cm and 100uS/cm is 10kohm.cm 1000uS.cm 1k ohm.cm)

    This is American, and their idea of clean tap water is not the same as ours, but it is similar.

    Note the dramatic effect of seawater -  less than 20 ohms across a 1cm cube.
    A nice demo of this can be done at the dining table with a traditional torch bulb and battery,  and a glass of water and the salt cellar - the lamp is off with the water from the jug in the circuit, but add salt and it rapidly brightens up, and then raising and lowering the cutlery into the solution gives a controllable dimmer action.
    I strongly suggest not doing this without the host's prior agreements, and not with expensive cutlery.
    cheap stainless is best. And do not use wine, its a waste.
    Mike.


    Mike.

Reply
  • More on water.

    In the table  below "442 solution" contain the following salts diluted in pure water: 40% sodium bicarbonate, 40% sodium sulphate and 20% sodium chloride. These represent the main conductive ions that are in typical surface and ground water. A purely sodium chloride solution is probably more representative of brackish or sea water.

    Converting to a single % 'TDS' total dissolved solids from measuring conductivity is a bit of a con, as the different ions do not have quite the same mobility in a given electric field, but close enough for some generalizations to within a factor of 2. That may sound terrible, but as the salt concentration varies by factors of ten and is about as uniform as wind-speed in places where water flows and mixes, it is often good enough.

    (1uS/cm is 1 megohm.cm and 100uS/cm is 10kohm.cm 1000uS.cm 1k ohm.cm)

    This is American, and their idea of clean tap water is not the same as ours, but it is similar.

    Note the dramatic effect of seawater -  less than 20 ohms across a 1cm cube.
    A nice demo of this can be done at the dining table with a traditional torch bulb and battery,  and a glass of water and the salt cellar - the lamp is off with the water from the jug in the circuit, but add salt and it rapidly brightens up, and then raising and lowering the cutlery into the solution gives a controllable dimmer action.
    I strongly suggest not doing this without the host's prior agreements, and not with expensive cutlery.
    cheap stainless is best. And do not use wine, its a waste.
    Mike.


    Mike.

Children
No Data