Colour of Wiring in Singles for PVC Conduit

I'm in the process of wiring up sockets and lighting to a new consumer unit in my shed. I plan on doing most of the wiring work myself before getting in a proper electrician that can tell me everything I've done wrong.

 

One mistake I want to avoid is making sure I actually wire it with suitable cable in the first place. I understand I'll need to use singles as I'll be using PVC conduit but as I'm only a DIYer and this is just a small installation I reckon I'll need only 25m of each colour cable but it seems that singles tend to be sold in 50/100m drums only.

 

My question is am I able to get away with wiring the whole thing with just one colour of cable i.e. all in black then sleeving or taping the terminations to indicate the correct colour of wire i.e. brown/blue/earth? I could also indicate the colour at inspection points as well to make it a little clearer.

  • I would advise against doing this. Even if not specifically prohibited it is considered very poor practice to deliberately use the wrong colours.

    You might be able to buy part rolls on fleabay, or from a local scrap dealer.

  • You definitely shouldn't use anything other than green and yellow for the earth.

    "Singles" is the proper type of cable and you can find it online sold by the metre. I think that a lot of people would simply use T&E.

  • At the risk of confusing matters why the conduit ?  could you not use T and E in minitrunking  for the bits that need a bit  of mechanical robustness. May be easier. Unless you have laid out and threaded conduit before beware that it is quite possible to make an unthreadable layout.

    If you must, then shorter lengths are certainly available than 100m, but not from wholesalers. Amazon and Ebay are your friends.

    Mike

    PS as above please do not use all one colour it is a recipe for total confusion, initially for you and later for anyone following on trying to add an extra socket in the middle or whatever.

    PS

    getting in a proper electrician that can tell me everything I've done wrong

    is far more expensive than doing it right to begin with. If you are going to involve a sparks at all (and building regs say you should but that is another post ) , now is the time to arrange it - anyone who agrees to sign it off, should, unless a total cowboy, will want to see it in mid build as well at the end.

  • I plan on doing most of the wiring work myself before getting in a proper electrician that can tell me everything I've done wrong.

    Just be aware of building regulations in you're in the UK - specifically Part P (if you're in England/Wales, slightly different in NI/Scotland) - since this work seems notifiable your options if not using a registered competent person to do the work is to either:

    • Before work begins, appoint a registered third party to oversee the work (which is a specific registration over and above the normal registered competent person, which I gather relatively few electricians hold).
    • Before work begins, notify a building control body (usually your local authority's building control dept.) - paying the appropriate fee (usually several hundred pounds).

    (I'm not saying that the procedures always get followed to the letter, but you should be aware of it, as it can come back to bite you e.g. at house sale time)

      - Andy.