Shock protection on luminaries

I know that other standards sometimes have different ideas about shock protection to BS 7671 (e.g. BC and ES lampholders having bare live parts). Does anyone here know what the requirements for shock protection (when basic insulation fails) for domestic wall lights - specifically the type supplied with a flex, in-line switch and plug (i.e. expected to be in-reach). I'm not sure which product standard would apply. My natural reaction was to expect them to be either earthed or marked as double insulated - but are there any other options allowed by the product standard?

As you might guess, I've been asked to fit one and it doesn't look at all right to me - steel fixing bracket seems to be exposed to wiring with just basic insulation at the back of the fitting, and is then in direct metallic contact with the dome nuts holding it all together at the front.

I didn't much like the idea that it was sold as retail but supplies as a kit of parts - flex had plug and switch fitted, but supplied with bare ends to connect to the fitting - nasty if a little one got hold of it and tried to plug it in... but that's a different issue.

          - Andy.

Parents
  • it will depend how the manufacturer intends it to comply, product standards are not as simple as the wiring regs and while class 0, 0A 1, 2 etc are convenient ways to describe appliance protection levels and earthing schemes, you may have a hybrid 'platypus device' with bits that fit more than one classification in the same device, which confuses matters. (note that class 0, no reinforced insulation, no CPC, and 0A - no reinforced insulation, and CPC as independent 'tail' are not accepted on mains devices in CE/UKCA land)

    I suspect the sleeving over the singles is intended to give reinforced insulation, but if it does or not is all about how well it performs on the hi pot test, and whatever other wear tests the makers may or may not have done.

    On the past I have been know to add a CPC to turn what felt like Class 0 into 0A - still not 'legal' but feels a lot safer. There are some pretty crummy light fittings out there.

    Mike

Reply
  • it will depend how the manufacturer intends it to comply, product standards are not as simple as the wiring regs and while class 0, 0A 1, 2 etc are convenient ways to describe appliance protection levels and earthing schemes, you may have a hybrid 'platypus device' with bits that fit more than one classification in the same device, which confuses matters. (note that class 0, no reinforced insulation, no CPC, and 0A - no reinforced insulation, and CPC as independent 'tail' are not accepted on mains devices in CE/UKCA land)

    I suspect the sleeving over the singles is intended to give reinforced insulation, but if it does or not is all about how well it performs on the hi pot test, and whatever other wear tests the makers may or may not have done.

    On the past I have been know to add a CPC to turn what felt like Class 0 into 0A - still not 'legal' but feels a lot safer. There are some pretty crummy light fittings out there.

    Mike

Children
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