Domestic Power Wiring - Upstairs & Downstairs

I have surveyed a house and have observed a domestic ring circuit which is serves a floor area exceeding 100m2, including upstairs, downstairs and utility containing (washing machine and tumble dryer) (kitchen ring is separate). I am ok with this circuit contravening the 100m2 guidance, and not being respective to the load of the whitegoods, but I understand there is guidance on a domestic ring only covering a single level.

Can somebody point me towards this guidance either in published Guidance Notes or the Regulations.

Thanks

Slight smile

Parents
  • Not aware of any guidance that says single level in the regs or the OSG - it is of course useful if there is more than one power circuit to divide it in a way that does not lead to the wrong circuit being isolated in an emergency.

    The regs requirement is that there is enough information that it is clear what the breaker or fuse is serving. It is much easier if that is 'sockets up' /'sockets down' or 'kitchen' /'non- kitchen' which are the two most common configurations around here but it is quite possible with the use of labels and a felt tip to cover almost any case.
    I have been known in the past to leave a 'map' in an envelope beside the CU in complex cases.


    Certainly nothing big to worry about unless it is showing signs of overload.


    Mike.

  • Thanks for your comments mapj1. I am aware of it being only guidance :) There are things happening in the house that have caused the investigation, so we do have signs of significant overloading. I do believe that if common guidance were used the end user would not have any issue and I am seeking to repair this circuit in line with common guidance.

    The reason I ask about upstairs/downstairs is that the wiring is not your typical all of downstairs and then all up upstairs. Is up/down/up/down/up/down ie the nearest socket irrespective of whether it's up or down. Don't know it that came across clear. 

    If I recommend that the circuit is wired as 2 rings Upstairs and Downstairs, we are looking at a full rewire of that full circuit, not good for the occupier nor the developer. If upstairs/downstairs is not in any published guidance I will recommend that the utility only is rewired. This reducing load and bringing the circuit below 100m2.

Reply
  • Thanks for your comments mapj1. I am aware of it being only guidance :) There are things happening in the house that have caused the investigation, so we do have signs of significant overloading. I do believe that if common guidance were used the end user would not have any issue and I am seeking to repair this circuit in line with common guidance.

    The reason I ask about upstairs/downstairs is that the wiring is not your typical all of downstairs and then all up upstairs. Is up/down/up/down/up/down ie the nearest socket irrespective of whether it's up or down. Don't know it that came across clear. 

    If I recommend that the circuit is wired as 2 rings Upstairs and Downstairs, we are looking at a full rewire of that full circuit, not good for the occupier nor the developer. If upstairs/downstairs is not in any published guidance I will recommend that the utility only is rewired. This reducing load and bringing the circuit below 100m2.

Children
  •  Is there enough slack capacity in the kitchen ring to to allow a 'kitchen and utility ring'  and a 'non kitchen and utility' ?

    Without seeing the layout of course it is hard to say but perhaps a new small lasoo in the utility and maybe blank off or unthread the sockets in that zone that are on the overloaded ring may be a suitable compromise.

    Unless the rest of the wiring is actually damaged, so long is it buzzes out OK, no real need to redo the lot, just redo the troubled sections.
    But  do make the circuit labelling clear or leave a map ;-)  the next guy in will really appreciate it.

    Mike.

  • The reason I ask about upstairs/downstairs is that the wiring is not your typical all of downstairs and then all up upstairs.

    I think that this is potentially dangerous because the labelling has to be pretty clear so that people do not make assumptions about the normal layout.  It may arise because of the history or layout of the house, particularly if two parts (with separate supplies at one time) have been joined.

    I take very little notice of the 100 m² rule - perimeter would make more sense, and you could squash several high-load appliances in a small place.

  • I can not tell you how to design and install your systems, but as long as the IET continue to reference 100m2 in Guidance Note 1, I will provided due consideration of it.